My Sister Dilly

Hannah Williams couldn’t get out of her small hometown fast enough, preferring the fast pace, trendy lifestyle and beauty of California’s Pacific Ocean coast.

Only when her younger sister, Dilly, makes a desperate choice does Hannah realize she never should have left her behind in rural Illinois.


 List Price: $12.99

Page Count: 352
Trim Size: 5 1/2 x 8 1/4
ISBN: 978-1-4143-2224-7
CPC Sub Category: FGE
Release Date: October 2008

Hannah Williams couldn’t get out of her small hometown fast enough, preferring the fast pace, trendy lifestyle and beauty of California’s Pacific Ocean coast.

Only when her younger sister, Dilly, makes a desperate choice does Hannah realize she never should have left her behind in rural Illinois.

Hannah returns home, anxious to atone for failing Dilly in the past, leaving the one man she’s ever loved in California. But Dilly is a changed woman, and when Hannah’s plans don’t go as expected, the bonds of sisterhood are tested like never before.

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Excerpt:

Raindrops spattered the windshield of my car, leaving see-through polka dots. Then they came down harder, each thwack pummeling any remnant of symmetrical design. Instinctively I reached for the wiper. But my hand stopped midway, almost as if it knew before my brain told me movement would be the wrong thing to do. A parked car, across from a schoolyard, with someone inside . . . lurking . . .

Even I, childless at thirty-five, knew such a scenario would attract the interest of school staff or a parent, if not outright suspicion. So what if I was a woman with no record. It wasn’t as if we carried that information on our foreheads. Even a momentary misunderstanding would be embarrassing and, considering what I’d come here to do, probably make a news story or two. Hannah Williams was questioned by police today . . .

So I sat. I would have welcomed the cover of rain if it hadn’t sent the kids back inside as they waited for the parade of squat little yellow buses lining up to collect them all. Most of the children, the ones who were mobile anyway, were herded inside, but several of those in wheelchairs were given shelter under a wide red awning attached to the play yard. Umbrellas appeared; hoods went up. Children were wheeled out to the ramps attached to the bus, where they were locked in, chair and all. Then the first little bus zoomed off, making room for another just like it to take its place.

I had no idea there would be so many students in wheelchairs. Rubbing my forehead, feeling the start of an ache, I acknowledged my own ignorance. But what else was I supposed to do? I had to try spotting her because I knew without a doubt that was the first thing my sister Dilly would ask. “Have you seen her?” Followed quickly by, “How did she look?”

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